français / english / 创瞰巴黎

Reflections on the concept of economic warfare

Business October 9th, 2017, Eric Delbecque / Head of Competitive Intelligence Department, Institute of training for local elected representatives

The contemporary capitalist world should not be confused with a realm of free competition, transparency and performance based on talent and meritocracy. Today, the business space is organized in terms of power relations in which the geopolitical and geo-economic dimensions assert themselves. Economic warfare is real: it is not an invention of essayists desperately seeking a catchy concept to attract media spotlight.

Mediterranean geopolitics: when central gets peripheral

Society September 21st, 2017, Cédrick Allmang / Professor of Geography, Lycée Saint-Louis, Paris

Sketching the geopolitics of the Mediterranean area requires to reverse the classical approach and instead of considering the Mediterranean as a center, examining its peripheral character. The geopolitics of the Mediterranean can therefore appear as typical of an era where, in order to understand the world, one must look at marginal spaces.

U.S. trade wars with emerging countries: make America (and its partners) lose again!

Business July 4th, 2017, Antoine Bouët & David Laborde / Senior Research Fellow, GREThA-University of Bordeaux and International Food Policy Research Institute (Washington, DC) & Senior Research Fellow, International Food Policy Research Institute

Would a new trade war launched by the US government make America lose again? Indeed. And what could be the economic and trade consequences for US trading partners?

China’s influence on world markets far outweighs the degree of integration of its own banks and financial markets with the rest of the world. While the country has only gradually eased controls on its capital account and foreign exchange markets, illicit flows of capital are playing an outsized role in some overseas markets and industries. This will change. But how and when? The “New Silk Road” project underlines Beijing’s ambition to keep promoting globalization, in a sharp contrast with the rise of protectionism in the US. But the pace of reforms needed to push that process forward has been slowing. Most than anything, Chinese authorities fear the volatility associated with a higher degree of integration.

The New Silk Road: an expansionist project or a new worldview?

Business May 31st, 2017, Hervé Machenaud / President, Paris Innovation Review's Chinese Edition

The Chinese initiative continues to raise many questions and no less controversial issues four years after its creation. What is its exact nature? What economic and political goals does it hide?

Is despair killing America’s white working class?

Society April 24th, 2017, Angus Deaton / Professor of Economics and International Affairs, Princeton University, Nobel Prize for Economics in 2015

Working class Americans in midlife's mortality rate, after 100 years of declining, has turned the wrong way or at least flattened out. This is not happening to other groups in the US. It’s not happening to Hispanics. It’s not happening to African-Americans. And it’s not happening in any other rich country in the world. Angus Deaton tried to make sense of a trend closely associated with the rise of populism in the US.

A revolution in US corporate tax

Business April 7th, 2017, François Meunier / President, Alsis Conseil, Associate Professor of Finance, ENSAE ParisTech

As reported by the media, US Republicans in the House of Representatives have launched an initiative to lower corporate tax to 20%, instead of 35% today, one step further in the tax competition between countries. The Trump administration seems to support the project. Donald Trump himself even mentioned the possibility of lowering this rate to 15%. As worrying as is seems for the United States' trading partners, this drop isn't even the most important part of the reform. In reality, the measure forms part of wider radical project that will give corporate tax the same features as a tax that doesn't exist in the United States, namely, VAT or value-added tax, probably the most innovative and popular tax (as far as governments are concerned) since the 1950s.

Top universities: new players in the global game of power?

Society February 15th, 2017, Cédric Denis-Rémis & Armand Hatchuel / Deputy Director of Mines ParisTech (PSL Université Paris) & Professor at Mines Paristech, Chair of Design Theory and Methodes for Innovation

The term university covers a wide range of institutions. In time, this diversity could narrow down to two main types of universities: a local model, with institutes and Bachelor degrees related to regional development; a global model, including prototypes such as Harvard or Oxford, and emerging players in Europe or China. These world-class universities can be seen as a new type of universal power.

Why American internet companies fail in China: a cultural perspective

Business September 5th, 2016, DONG Jielin / Associate Professor and Member of the Academic Committee, Research Center for Technological Innovation, Tsinghua University

Different hierarchies of needs explain why, in the internet industry and other high-tech industries in China, there are both the Chinese way and the Silicon Valley way of doing business, and why some big American companies have been struggling to make headway here. High-tech sounds high-up, but for online service providers, it all boils down to understanding other people’s ways of thinking and doing things. They have to understand local governments, their employees, business partners, users and clients. Looking back, the U.S. internet giants that failed were simply out of tune with the Chinese market. They didn’t clearly see the importance of understanding Chinese culture; they talked to the wrong people in the wrong ways about the wrong things.

Value creation and global chains: new business models

Business June 29th, 2016, Corinne Vadcar / Senior Trade Analyst, Institut Friedland

The slowdown in international trade and the digital revolution converge to shake up global value chains, a paradigm for international trade since approximately 25 years. A value chain, it should be recalled, encompasses all of the activities that form a product or service, from its conception to its use by the end consumer. The globalization of value chains that began in the early 1990s opened a cycle that now seems to bend. On these different links, the way value is created changes greatly. Western companies draw lessons by changing their business model. But emerging countries have also entered the game. Ultimately, maybe only a few winners with a global corporate status will be left.

Is there a future for the British steel industry?

Industries May 11th, 2016, Elie Cohen / Economist, Senior Researcher, Sciences Po

The sinking of the British steel industry has resulted in confusing, and sometimes contradictory debates. The politicization of these challenges tends to obscure questions having primarily to do with industrial strategies. Strategies of the concerned companies of course, but also those of States and Europe.

The great convergence: China’s future lies in its west

Business December 12th, 2015, Julien Legrand / Yenching Scholar & Mines ParisTech Engineer

Since Reform and Opening Up began in 1978, China has witnessed exponential double-digit GDP growth. While the coastal regions provided most of China's GDP growth, central and western China were quickly outpaced, as they lacked both the openness and the infrastructure needed to adopt this model. Coastal-inland inequalities are now closing the gap.

A pocket-sized multinational

Industries November 10th, 2015, Georges Jobard / Chairman, F2i, Innovation and Strategy Consultant

Clextral is an engineering company located in Firminy near Saint-Etienne, France. It employs 275 people including 80 engineers, sells its machines in 88 countries and has subsidiaries and offices on every continent. What's the secret?

Articles analyzing why there's no Chinese innovation are all over the place. Meanwhile, the situation is changing at a rapid pace. How do Chinese entrepreneurs move from imitators to innovators? To better understand these issues, our Chinese edition invited a number of pioneers and observers at the front-line of domestic and international innovations.

Competitiveness in the industry: let’s talk about services

Industries April 7th, 2015, Vincent Champain / COO France, General Electric, Co-chairman, Observatoire du long terme

Today, manufacturers operate in a harsh competitive environment. How can they maintain and develop their competitive edges? What kind of industrial policy can help them when facing this challenge?

This is the other side of globalization: more and more cases of misunderstanding. However, it is not impossible to avoid them. All you need are a few keys that allow you to step into the other person's shoes. Here are ten such keys, covering some especially sensitive points met in the business world.

Growth or stagnation? A world tour

Business November 14th, 2014, Eric Chaney / Chief Economist AXA Group & Head of Research AXA IM

Is the global crisis behind us? The divergent development of major emerging countries, Europe and the United States reminds us that despite a strong tendency for unification during the past two decades, despite our growing interdependence, the world economy is still highly fragmented. Under the circumstance, it doesn't make sense to draw a general picture without taking a closer look at these differences: between emerging and advanced countries, between the United States and Europe, and even within Europe itself.

Offshoring or reshoring? A dilemma for service activities

Industries October 30th, 2014, E.M. Mouhoud / Professeur of Economics, Paris Dauphine University, PSL Research University

Delocalization and automation are now impacting the service sector, with noteworthy consequences on employment in developed countries. Even in the case of highly intellectual activities, a number of inherent tasks can be codified and pre-programmed; some of the processes involved can be automated just like similar industrial applications. The tasks can be automated or executed remotely. Notwithstanding, not all services can be delocalised. It is in the interest of any territorial entity (conurbation, region, city…) seeking to define its strategy for future development or reconversion, to identify and indeed reinforce those services that offer clear competitive edges.

Robotics Series – 6 – Terminators of the world factory?

Business October 23rd, 2014, Fangru YANG / Executive Editor of Modern Weekly Business Page, Taiwan high-tech industry observer

You may not know Hon Hai, but it is to produce 70% of all iPhones 6. It also operates the largest factories on Earth. Terry Gou, founder and chairman, based his success on cheap labor costs as well as audacious merging strategies. Will the rise of automated factories mean the end of this success story, and more broadly the end of China as the world factory? As a matter of fact, Mr. Gou is fond of robots, and he won't be the last to launch an automated factory. But he may need Chinese arms for a while. Here is why.

The African digital boom has already begun. McKinsey estimates that the contribution of the Internet to the annual GDP of Africa could rise from $18 billion in 2014 to $300 billion in 2025. Yet, all the countries are not addressing the digital wave with the same attitude.

www.parisinnovationreview.com

This content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
You are free to share, copy, distribute and transmit this content

Logo creative commons

5 quai Voltaire 75007 Paris, France - Email : contact@parisinnovationreview.com / Landline : +33 1 44 50 32 89